Twitch streamers say new ban notifications aren’t enough – ‘your team took three months of my life’

Twitch has announced they are making changes to enforcement notifications sent to suspended users.

However, many streamers believe they’re not doing enough.

Notifications will now include the name of the content violation and date of the violation, so that streamers can more easily identify the exact piece of content that violated terms of service.

A tweet from Twitch Support offers an example of what the new notifications will look like, including the stream name, date, and where it occurred.

As of today, enforcement notifications sent to suspended users will include the name of the content and the date of the violation to ensure they have better clarity about what content is being actioned on. pic.twitter.com/aAnrdEZoyi

— Twitch Support (@TwitchSupport) August 9, 2021

What’s missing, however, is a time stamp. When each stream for the majority of streamers can last multiple hours, the new notifications still don’t identify the exact moment.

Streamers have responded to the tweet asking for either a time stamp, or a clip of the offending content.

Having proper detailed explanation may take up more time. But at least that ensures your content creators are being well informed for future streams instead of listing your TOS and FAQ which are all fairly vague. Inform us properly to help us be better creators. Thank you.

— Dogsfnt (@dogsfnt) August 9, 2021

The whole platform is made of time stamps but they won’t give you one to tell you when the supposed violation took place. When you appeal, its just another robot email with no explanation. This doesn’t look like it will be any better.

— Aenima316 (@Aenima316) August 9, 2021

This is a step in the right direction but still not nearly enough @TwitchSupport. We need to be told what the offending content was, preferably with a clip, and given the chance to make things right.

Your moderation team took 3 months of my life and growth over an “accident”.

— Blu_Haze (@Blu_Haze) August 10, 2021

In recent months, a number of streamers have been banned for content on their streams. It includes Spanish streamer Ibai who was banned because someone else showed their bum; and hot tub streamer ExoHydraX who was banned for supposedly twerking.

The replies to Twitch’s tweet also include Anne Atomic, a trans hot tub streamer who was banned for nudity despite following Twitch terms of service.

Atomic was unhappy with her treatment by the platform which she perceived as transphobic, as well as a lack of response.

Since then, she had her ban lifted, only to be suspended again for supposed nudity on a stream where she was clothed and playing games.

“Here we go again,” she wrote in a tweet with a screenshot of the ban notification.

Why would a violation like this result in a permanent ban rather than a warning or a one day suspension, as is the standard? Why can’t they even say when or what the violation even was for? And why can’t I ever get a reply from Twitch support on any appeals, ever?

— Anne Atomic (@AnneAtomics) August 8, 2021

“Why would a violation like this result in a permanent ban rather than a warning or a one day suspension, as is the standard? Why can’t they even say when or what the violation even was for? And why can’t I ever get a reply from Twitch support on any appeals, ever?” she stated in the thread.

Twitch may have made changes to their notifications, but it’s a small step when – in the eyes of streamers on the platform – a giant leap is required.

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